Earnie

Submitted by markholmgren on March 19, 2013 - 8:49pm
One of my mentors

I wrote this little story – a blend of fiction and non-fiction – some years ago and just rediscovered it in my personal archives (which is a nice way of saying, among the stacks of papers kept in many boxes). It was written in the summer-time, but for me, it is a Christmas story about hope and change. I hope you like it.

***

ERNIE

Like you, I am frequently approached for a hand-out by someone on the street. Sometimes I hand over some change. Sometimes I don’t. When I don’t is when I find myself rationalizing that I don’t want to support someone’s drinking habit. Giving them a sandwich would be more appropriate, I tell myself. But of course, I don’t carry a sandwich in my pocket and I don’t go buy them one.  I just walk away with my self-sustaining rationale.

I bet most of us do that more often than not. Yes, I know. Handing over a dollar won’t solve anything. What difference will I make? Maybe I will cause more harm than good. Who knows? Then I remember a fellow I knew years ago. His name was Ernie. He had been on the streets for twenty years – a heavy drinker, the personification of a “bum.” The kind of man you walk around if you see him coming down the street. All of my colleagues figured he would die on the streets.

Ernie comes to mind for a couple reasons. First, because he was always willing to share what he had – which wasn’t much – with anyone who asked. He was just that way, an all around nice guy (despite his rough appearance), even when drunk on Lysol or cheap wine. Second, one day Ernie just quit drinking and never started again — at least for as long as I kept track of him anyway, which was for several years.

One day I asked why he just stopped drinking.

He gave me a big smile and shook his head. “I don’t really know,” he said. “I just woke up one morning and said that’s it. I’m done. I threw out what little booze I had in my room, took the empties to the depot and headed to the Gold Nugget for breakfast.”

I guess I was looking for more of a watershed moment from Ernie, some kind of spiritual turning point – anything other than “I don’t really know.”

“Something troubling you, son?”

I shook my head. “I just thought you would know the reason.”

Ernie laughed. “I can think of some now, looking back. Like I didn’t want to die yet. But at the time, the honest truth is I didn’t know. I just quit.” He paused for a moment. Ernie had always been a thoughtful man and had an uncanny sense of other people. “You,” he said. “You were good to me – and the others at the drop-in, you know, the workers there.”

“Thanks,” I said. “I wasn’t fishing though…”

“Maybe you were, maybe you weren’t,” Ernie said. “But it’s true anyways. It wasn’t that you were social workers. You were just people, decent you know. You gave me change, bummed me smokes, gave me rides when my arthritis was bad. You just hung out and talked. I never got the feeling you were trying to save me. I hated that – people trying to save me.”

I didn’t know quite what to say, so I shifted gears. “So did you enjoy your breakfast that first day – you know, at the Gold Nugget.”

“Nope,” Ernie said. “I got sick like a dog, and then I gave all my change to Stanley – you know him, right?”

I nodded.

“He was in a bad way and needed a fix more than I needed my little bit of cash.”

“I understand,” I said.

Ernie looked at me. He smiled a little. “I imagine you do, son. I imagine you do.”

I don’t know where Ernie is today, but I have a feeling he is alive and sober. He’s still poor no doubt and living day to day on his disability checks. He’s probably still off the streets living in a small room in McCauley or somewhere along 118th Avenue.

But one thing I know for sure. When Ernie comes across an outstretched hand, he stops and gives them what he can. Knowing him, he likely has a chat as well. And when he finally does move along, he’s not wondering if he should have bought them a sandwich. Maybe he understands these things better than we do because he was there and then one day things just changed. I figure that if that can happen to an old alcoholic bum named Ernie, maybe it can happen to other folks, too, even folks like you and me.

The very last time I saw Ernie was a couple years after I left my job in the inner city. I was walking along Whyte Avenue on my way to Greenwoods to buy a book. He was headed the other way, moving slowly with his wooden cane.

“Hey, Ernie,” I said. “Long time.”

Ernie looked up at me and smiled. It took him a moment to recognize me. “Mark,” he said. “How’s things?”

“Good,” I said. “Real good. You?”

“Same as usual. My leg hurts a bit more lately than usual, but can’t complain really.”

We stood there for a few minutes, talking about other folks we knew, those who had died, others who had left town, the few who were still walking 96th Street each day. People streamed by us, oblivious to our reunion, except for a young man in a business suit who gave us a dirty look for being in his way.

Ernie smiled at the man. “To have old friends, son, you got to make a few first.”

I laughed. The young man didn’t, but he went away.

And then it was time. “Mark,” Ernie said. “I should be getting on.”

We said our goodbyes and then continued on our separate ways. A few steps later, I turned around. “Ernie,” I yelled.

Ernie turned half way toward me.

“Good to see you,” I said.

Ernie nodded and gave me a little wave with his cane and then shuffled off through the crowd.

As I waved back I caught my reflection in the shop window. I stepped forward to get a better look but then thought better of it. I didn’t want to frighten people in the store gawking like some stalker! So I crossed the street and walked into the bookstore. I felt different somehow, but wasn’t sure why. All I know is I felt somehow changed by an old man with a bum leg who had quit drinking years ago for reasons he didn’t understand at the time.

Like most people, I wish for a lot of things in my life. I hope my children will be happy. I hope my wife loves me as much as I love her. I would like more money, who wouldn’t?  I hope for less violence and pain in the world.

I also wish I could be more like Ernie. And on that day in the middle of summer, I wished for that more than anything.

 

 

reprinted from www.bissellcentre.org

Comments:
Beautiful!

Hi Mark,

Thanks so much for this story- it really inspired me.

I spent 4 years volunteering with downtown folks and feel like they taught me so much about life and myself. What a blessing!

Thanks for sharing :)